Leadership Projects

EXAMPLES

LEADERSHIP SIGNUP

SUMMARY

Write your summary last, at the end of the day here… Only one to two sentences. – AND THEN DELETE THESE WORDS!

LEADERSHIP ACTIVITY

  1. Pick one of the following: Leading by being part of a team or Leading by example
  2. Place your project idea, the description, and the outcome here: bit.ly/2ZxekGt
  3. Write the same thing above these instructions about under the LEADERSHIP ACTIVITY heading
  4. Delete Mr. Le Duc’s instructions – yes, these instructions – yes the instructions you are reading right now!

LEADERSHIP PROJECT

  • Embed your evidence here. Place a screenshot and/or embed media (Music, Video, Link to itch.io) – AND THEN DELETE THESE WORDS!

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Tell your story here!  Highlight what you learned and enjoyed most and at least one problem you solved. Problem-solving is one of the most important skills you need in life. Employers want to know HOW you get stuff done as much as WHAT you got done – AND THEN DELETE THESE WORDS!

Linkedin Profile Draft TEMPLATE

  • TITLE THIS BLOG POST: Linkedin Profile Draft
  • FILL IN UNDER ALL THE HEADINGS BELOW
  • REVIEW THESE POST EXAMPLES:
    • Coming Soon!
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS AFTER COMPLETING THEM

Summary

  • In a small paragraph, summarize the key attributes an employer would want in an employee

Experience

  • Place a shortlist of jobs you have held
  • You may include babysitting, mowing the lawn, etc. 

Education

  • Place Capital High School here
  • You may have other educational institutions like South Puget Sound Community College

Top Skills

  • Write a short list of skills you possess that would attract the attention of an employer

EXAMPLE:

  • Collaborative
  • Problem Solving
  • Project Management
  • Communication

Certifications

Place the title and year awarded here…

Honors-Awards

Place the title and year awarded here…

Sample Solo Film for CapitalComTech.info

An Innu with Mr. George Valiquette’s movie camera (Hudson Strait Expedition), Wakeham Bay, Nunavik, Quebec, 1928 /
CC image An Innu with Mr. George Valiquette’s movie camera (Hudson Strait Expedition), Wakeham Bay, Nunavik, Quebec, 1928 / at Flickr.com

STUDENT SAMPLES

  • Coming soon……

WHAT

  1. Select a scene in a film to copy
  2. Embed the 30 to 60-second scene into your  Solo Film #1 Production Project blog post
  3. Research the film and the scene you chose
  4. Create and embed your version of the 30 to 60-second scene into your  Solo Film #1 Production Project blog post
    • Use any equipment you have; phone, Chromebook, etc.
    • Edit with any free video editor you have access to iMovie, YouTube, phone, or our classWeVideo.com account
  5. Complete the blog post with the material listed in the HOW section below

WHY

  • Learning film language by copying quality work is a great way to start to express yourself through visual and audio media

WHERE

HOW

  • Copy and paste the Solo Film #1 Production Project TEMPLATE into yourEdublogs.org blog
  • Inspiration
    • Research a 60-second film scene you can access on YouTube
  • Intention
    • Write your Intention or SMART (Goal) for your film under the Intention (SMART Goal) heading
      • Be specific: what do you hope the audience feels, learns, experiences, etc. by watching your film?
      • Write a one-sentence SMART Goal with help from the example material below
      • Use the SMART Goal Format Worksheet (PDF) for guidance in writing your actual one-sentence SMART Goal section of the Stretch Goal
        • Mitchell’s modified example:
          • “By April 30, as part of my film team, I will explore the film director’s skill pathway by following the Studio Binder Eye Tracing tutorial and will have created scenes that direct the audience’s eye from affinity to contrast, this will increase intensity over the six scenes of our April project.”
      • Mitchell’s SMART Goal broken down by element
        • Remember we build our SMART goals backward: T R A M S – S M A R T
        • T– Time (DATE): By April 30
        • R-Relevance (CLASS/TEAM X): as part of my film team, I will explore the film director’s skill pathway 
        • A-Attainable (TUTORIAL X) by following the Studio Binder Eye Tracing tutorial
        • M-Measurable (MAKE/CREATE # of X): and will have created scenes that direct the audience’s eye from affinity to contrast, this will increase intensity over the six scenes
        • S-Specific (PROJECT X): of our Session 5 project.”
  • PRE-PRODUCTION
    • Select a scene in a film to copy from YouTube
    • Embed the 30 to 60-second scene into your  Solo Film #1 Production Project blog post
    • Research the film and the scene you chose
      • Who created the scene?
        • Director?
        • Film Company?
        • Network TV or Streaming Service?
      • What is important about the scene, the film, the TV show?
      • Why is this scene important to the film or TV show episode?
      • What is happening in the scene to further the bigger story?
    • Create a reverse storyboard of the scene on paper
      • Fold a piece of paper in half 4 times to create a template for storyboarding like the sample below
        • cp_sample_storyboard_natalie
      • Review the sample scene from the show Mad Men
      • Click the full version of the reverse storyboard of the Mad Men scene
      • Take a picture of your storyboard
      • Upload and embed your picture under the Reverse Storyboard of Film Clip heading
  • PRODUCTION
    • Create your version of the 30 to 60-second scene into your  Solo Film #1 Production Project blog post
    • Export your film from WeVideo
    • Save the exported file to your Google Drive
    • Make sure your share the Google Drive file publically
    • Place a link under the Student Copy of Film Clip heading
  • POST-PRODUCTION
    • Share your work with the class and receive feedback
    • Under the Reactions to the Final Version heading…
      • Write a few questions for the audience to consider
        • What feedback do you want from the audience to help you improve your skills?
      • After you receive this feedback, add it to your post
      • Cite the sources with their first name only
    • Finish the rest of the post
    • Make sure your blog post is published publically 
    • Have someone edit your post with the Solo Film #1 Production Project Feedback Form (PDF)
    • Make any necessary changes
    • Turn in your Solo Film #1 Production Project Feedback Form (PDF) to Mr. Le Duc

RESOURCES

Short Films

Melody Research, Analysis, and Recording Project TEMPLATE

Summary

  • In a small paragraph, write WHAT THIS PROJECT IS ABOUT. Your audience is someone who is not in the class. So, be specific.
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS AFTER COMPLETING THEM

My First HookTheory Melody

  • Place a screenshot of your 8 measure melody from hookpad.hooktheory.com
  • Link to a .mp3 file of your first HookTheory melody that you exported from hookpad.hooktheory.com
  • Write a brief reflection about this melody. What do you like about it?
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS AFTER COMPLETING THEM

Notes from Howard Goodall’s Melody Video

Cue Notes
Write your questions here…

Write your notes here…

 

Summary: Summarize what you learned from the video here..

Melody Composition Terms and Definitions

  • Theme: A long, flowing melodic idea.
  • Motive: A short, rhythmic idea (Beethoven’s 5th).
  • Period: 8-12 measures or a musical sentence.
  • Phrase: Usually 4 measures.
  • Antecedent (Question) Phrase: First 4 measures of a period.
  • Consequent (Answer) Phrase: Second 4 measures of a period.
  • Scale Degrees (C Major Scale)
    • Tonic: C (1 , 8) – Stability and resolve.
    • Supertonic, Mediant, Submediant: D, E, A (2 , 3 , 6) – Moderate tension, useful for transitions and carrying on an idea.
    • Subdominant, Dominant, Leading Tone: F, G, B (4 , 5 , 7) – Causes the most tension, leads to the tonic.
  • Steps: Any movement using half or whole steps.
  • Leaps: Any movement using intervals larger than a whole step.
  • Conjunct motion: Melody is built primarily out of steps.
  • Disjunct motion: Melody is built primarily out of leaps.
  • Repetition: Repeated material (i.e. motive) used to create a link between two phrases of the period.
  • Contrast: Two phrases that contain contrasting material to create tension and interest.
  • Variation: Halfway between contrast and repetition. The two phrases include some recognizable material and some varied material (i.e. taking ideas up an octave).

One of My Favorite Melodies

  • Find one of your favorite melodies at Hook Theory Tab Index of Songs
  • Embed a clean version of this song from YouTube
  • In writing, describe why you like this melody, and identify the musical key, tonic note, and tension notes
  • What do you notice about the note structure/pattern of the theme of the melody?
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS AFTER COMPLETING THEM

My Second HookTheory Melody

  • Place a screenshot of the melody notes on HookTheory
  • Link to a .mp3 file of your second melody from HookTheory
  • Write a brief reflection about this melody. What do you like about it?
    • Where did you raise tension or suspense in the melody?
    • Where did you resolve tension in the melody?
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS AFTER COMPLETING THEM

What I Learned & Problems I Solved

  • Write what you LEARNED from the research, analysis, and melody creation parts of this project
  • Explain how you SOLVED AT LEAST ONE PROBLEM
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS AFTER COMPLETING THEM

Resources

Making Motives with Triads TEMPLATE

Summary

  • In a small paragraph, write what you DID for this project

Melody Terms and Definitions

In music, a triad is a set of three notes (or “pitch classes“) that can be stacked vertically in thirds.[1] The term “harmonic triad” was coined by Johannes Lippius in his Synopsis musicae novae (1612). Triads are the most common chords in Western music.

When stacked in thirds, notes produce triads. The triad’s members, from lowest-pitched tone to highest, are called:[1]

    • The root
    • The third
    • The fifth

– Triad definition from Wikipedia

  • Theme – a longer, more flowing melodic idea
  • Motive – a short, rhythmic idea
  • Period – 8 (ish/around 8) measures of music
  • Phrase – 4 (ish/around 4) measures of music
  • Antecedent (Question or First) Phrase – sets the music up and leads you to expect something
  • Consequent (Answer or Second) Phrase – releases the tension built up by the first phrase
  • Scale Degrees:
    • Tonic Scale Degree – the note that begins and ends the scale, the note that releases the tension, one scale degree that creates a feeling of stability and resolution.
    • Supertonic, Mediant, and Submediant Scale Degree – scale degrees with a moderate level of tension useful for transitioning and carrying on an idea
    • Dominant, Subdominant, and Leading Tone Scale Degree – the notes that build tension, several scale degrees that create a high level of tension/the need to resolve the tonic
  • Steps – any movement using half or whole steps
  • Leaps – any movement using intervals larger than a whole-step
  • Conjunct motion –  melody built primarily out of steps that move smoothly (example: moving in a scale)
  • Disjunct motion – melody built primarily using leaps
  • Repetition (the god particle of music) – use repeated material to create a link between the two phrases of a period
  • Contrast – write two phrases that contain contrast material to create tension and interest
  • Variation – halfway between repetition and contrast. The two phrases include some recognizable material and some varied material.

Composition term definitions from Dr. Henke’s video:  How to Write a Melody

My Motives

  • Upload & link or embed at least three .mp3 from SoundCloud.com or your Google Drive

Feedback

  • Write a few comments from other students or advisory members
  • Cite the person who shared the comment
  • Only use first names

What I Learned & Problems I Solved

  • Write what you LEARNED
  • Explain how you SOLVED AT LEAST ONE PROBLEM
  • Link to a tutorial you followed

Visual Story Structure Research TEMPLATE

Seven Visual Story Components

Cue Notes
  Space
  Line and Shape
  Tone
  Color
  Movement
  Rhythm
   

Summary

 

Resources

 

 

DAW Audio Composition Project TEMPLATE

Summary

  • In a small paragraph, write what you DID for this project

Audio File Formats and Definitions

AIFF (Audio Interchange File Format): stores standard CD-quality audio; similar to WAV (Higher Quality)

WAV (Waveform Audio File Format): CD audio; can be saved with different sampling and bit rates; similar to AIFF (Higher Quality)

MP3 (Audio File): Used to store audiobooks and music on a hard drive; Close to CD-quality sound; the higher quality sound comes from higher bit rates which also take up more storage space

MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface): music data: notes played, when notes are played, how long each note is played, and the velocity of each note played; used to be able to exchange and use information between software and hardware programs; no actual audio data

All the audio file format information is found at: fileinfo.com

Song Used As Template

  • Embed appropriate YouTube video of the song
  • A brief written description of WHY you chose this song GarageBand

GarageBand Tracks

My Composition

  • Upload & link or embed an .mp3 from SoundCloud.com or your Google Drive

Feedback

  • Write a few comments from other students or advisory members
  • Cite the person who shared the comment
  • Only use first names

What I Learned & Problems I Solved

  • Write what you LEARNED
  • Explain how you SOLVED AT LEAST ONE PROBLEM
  • Link to a tutorial you followed

SMART Goal Project TEMPLATE

SUMMARY

Role

Intention (SMART Goal)

PRE-PRODUCTION – INQUIRY

Leader(s) in the Field / Exemplary Work(s)

Training Source(s)

SMART Goal Schedule

PRODUCTION

SMART Goal Starting Point Evidence

SMART Goal Ending Point Evidence

POST-PRODUCTION – REFLECTION

21st Century Skills

Ways of Thinking (Creativity, Innovation, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving)

Ways of Working (Communication & Collaboration)

Tools for Working (Info & Media Literacy)

Ways of Living in the World (Life & Career)

Reactions to the Final Version

Self-Evaluation of Final Version

Grammar and Spelling

Editor

Film Feedback Template with Filmmaker Commentary

COPY AND PASTE THE DIRECTIONS AND HEADING BELOW AND FOLLOW THEM.

DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s DIRECTIONS – WHEN YOU ARE DONE!

NAME THE POST IN THE TOP TITLE BOX: Your Film Name Feedback

EMBED YOUR FILM FROM YOUTUBE AT THE TOP OF THE POST

EMBED YOUR COMMENTED FILM – WITH FILM EDITS IDENTIFIED WITH TEXT ON SCREEN – FROM YOUTUBE AT BELOW YOUR UNCOMMENTED FILM

LOOK AT EXAMPLES: Lindsay, Naomi,

Summary

  • Write a brief description of your project

Logline

  • Include your logline
    • EXAMPLE: “SomeONE or THING fighting someONE or someTHING for SOMETHING.”

Intent / Goals

  • FOR YOU: What was one TECHNICAL and one CREATIVE goal you set for yourself RELATED TO THE ROLE you fulfilled in making this project (Example: Editor, Director, etc,)? Use SPECIFIC TECHNICAL / CREATIVE TERMS in your explanation
  • FOR THE PROJECT: Include the goal(s) of your film (what did you want the audience to feel/learn/experience?)

Research

  • What established person/people did you research to better prepare you for your role? Example: editor and sound designer Walter Murch
  • What about them was interesting, compelling, and qualified them to be studied by you?

Questions

  • Write two questions for the audience
  • What feedback do you want from the audience to help you improve your filmmaking skills?
  • You will post these questions to the Zoom chat before we watch your film so people can focus their attention on your requested feedback when they see your film

Peer Feedback

  • Write the feedback you received from other students
  • After you receive feedback, add it to your post
  • Cite the student sources with only their first names
    • Citation with specific names is more professional