Film Feedback Template with Filmmaker Commentary

COPY AND PASTE THE DIRECTIONS AND HEADING BELOW AND FOLLOW THEM.

DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s DIRECTIONS – WHEN YOU ARE DONE!

NAME THE POST IN THE TOP TITLE BOX: Your Film Name Feedback

EMBED YOUR FILM FROM YOUTUBE AT THE TOP OF THE POST

EMBED YOUR COMMENTED FILM – WITH FILM EDITS IDENTIFIED WITH TEXT ON SCREEN – FROM YOUTUBE AT BELOW YOUR UNCOMMENTED FILM

LOOK AT EXAMPLES: Lindsay, Naomi,

Summary

  • Write a brief description of your project

Logline

  • Include your logline
    • EXAMPLE: “SomeONE or THING fighting someONE or someTHING for SOMETHING.”

Intent / Goals

  • FOR YOU: What was one TECHNICAL and one CREATIVE goal you set for yourself RELATED TO THE ROLE you fulfilled in making this project (Example: Editor, Director, etc,)? Use SPECIFIC TECHNICAL / CREATIVE TERMS in your explanation
  • FOR THE PROJECT: Include the goal(s) of your film (what did you want the audience to feel/learn/experience?)

Research

  • What established person/people did you research to better prepare you for your role? Example: editor and sound designer Walter Murch
  • What about them was interesting, compelling, and qualified them to be studied by you?

Questions

  • Write two questions for the audience
  • What feedback do you want from the audience to help you improve your filmmaking skills?
  • You will post these questions to the Zoom chat before we watch your film so people can focus their attention on your requested feedback when they see your film

Peer Feedback

  • Write the feedback you received from other students
  • After you receive feedback, add it to your post
  • Cite the student sources with only their first names
    • Citation with specific names is more professional

Song Feedback TEMPLATE

DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s ALL UPPERCASE WORDS – WHEN YOU ARE DONE!

NAME THE POST IN THE TOP TITLE BOX: Your Song Name Feedback

EMBED YOUR SONG FROM GOOGLE DRIVE or SOUNDCLOUD AT THE TOP OF THE POST

LOOK AT EXAMPLES:  Connor, Tristan, Michael, Matthew

Summary

  • Write a brief description of your project
  • Include your logline
    • EXAMPLE: “SomeONE or THING fighting someONE or someTHING for SOMETHING.”
  • Include the goal(s) of your song (what did you want the audience to feel/learn/experience?)

Questions

  • Write two questions for the audience
  • What feedback do you want from the audience to help you improve your songwriting skills?
  • You will post these questions to the Zoom chat before we listen to your song so people can focus their attention on your requested feedback when hearing your song

Peer Feedback

  • Write the feedback you received from other students
  • After you receive feedback, add it to your post
  • Cite the student sources with only their first names
    • Citation with specific names is more professional

Film Feedback TEMPLATE

DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s ALL UPPERCASE WORDS – WHEN YOU ARE DONE!

NAME THE POST IN THE TOP TITLE BOX: Your Film Name Feedback

EMBED YOUR FILM FROM YOUTUBE AT THE TOP OF THE POST

LOOK AT EXAMPLES: Malachi, Naomi, Josie, Isaac, and Robbie

Summary

  • Write a brief description of your project
  • Include your logline
    • EXAMPLE: “SomeONE or THING fighting someONE or someTHING for SOMETHING.”
  • Include the goal(s) of your film (what did you want the audience to feel/learn/experience?)

Feedback Questions

  • Write two questions for the audience
  • What feedback do you want from the audience to help you improve your filmmaking skills?
  • You will post these questions to the Zoom chat before we watch your film so people can focus their attention on your requested feedback when they see your film

Peer Feedback

  • Write the feedback you received from other students
  • After you receive feedback, add it to your post
  • Cite the student sources with only their first names
    • Citation with specific names is more professional

Game Feedback TEMPLATE

 

DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s ALL UPPERCASE WORDS – WHEN YOU ARE DONE!

NAME THE POST IN THE TOP TITLE BOX: Your Game Name Feedback

ADD ARTWORK FROM GAME AT THE TOP OF THE POST – IT LOOKS COOL (OPTIONAL)

INSERT LINK TO ITCH.IO PAGE HERE

LOOK AT BREV’s EXAMPLE POST and GAME

VISIT THE LINK TO THE GAME JAM

Summary

  • Write a brief description of your project
  • Include your logline
    • EXAMPLE: “SomeONE or THING fighting someONE or someTHING for SOMETHING.”
  • Include the goal(s) of your game (the win state)

Questions

  • Write two questions for the audience
  • What feedback do you want from the audience to help you improve your game-making skills?
  • You will post these questions to the Zoom chat before we play your game so people can focus their attention on your requested feedback when they play your game

Peer Feedback

  • Write the feedback you received from other students
  • After you receive feedback, add it to your post
  • Cite the student sources with only their first names
    • Citation with specific names is more professional

Nick’s Analysis of Marvel Movies

“SDCC13 – Marvel Group Photo [II]” by W10002 is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Film Analysis: Pan’s Labyrinth

Summary

  • IN ONE TO TWO SENTENCES, DESCRIBE WHAT FILM YOU ANALYZED FOR THIS PROJECT AND WHY YOU CHOSE IT
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s ALL UPPERCASE INSTRUCTIONS ABOVE

Film Analysis

Film Title
Pan’s Labyrinth
Year 2006
Director
Guillermo del Toro
Country
 Mexico | Spain
Genre
Drama | Fantasy | War
If you could work on this film (change it), what would you change and why?

Film information can be found at imdb.com

As you view films, consider how the cuts, camera angles, shots, and movement work to create particular meanings. Think about how they establish space, privilege certain characters, suggest relationships, and emphasize themes. In addition to shot distances, angles, editing, and camera movement, note details of the narrative, setting, characters, lighting, props, costume, tone, and sound.

Ask yourself the following questions:

TOPIC YOUR NOTES
1. Who is the protagonist?
2. Who is the antagonist?
3. What is the conflict?
4. What is the theme or central, unifying concept? (summarize in one or two words)
5. How is the story told (linear, non-linear, with flashbacks, flash-forwards, at regular intervals)
6. What “happens” in the plot (Brief description)?
7. How does the film influence particular reactions on the part of viewers (sound, editing,
characterization, camera movement, etc.)? Why does the film encourage such
reactions?
8. Is the setting realistic or stylized? What atmosphere does the setting suggest? Do particular objects or settings serve symbolic functions?
9. How are the characters costumed and made-up? What does their clothing or makeup reveal about their social standing, ethnicity, nationality, gender, or age? How do costume and makeup convey character?
10. How does the lighting design shape our perception of character, space, or mood?
11. How do camera angles and camera movements shape our view of characters or spaces? What do you see cinematically?
12. What is the music’s purpose in the film? How does it direct our attention within the image? How does it shape our interpretation of the image? What stands out about the music?
13. How might industrial, social, and economic factors have influenced the film? Describe how this film influences or connects to a culture?
14. Give an example of what a film critic had to say about this film. Use credible sources and cite sources.

Example: “The Shawshank Redemption Movie Review (1994) | Roger Ebert.” All Content. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 June 2015.

15. Select one scene no longer than 5 minutes that represents well the whole film and shows relevant cinematic elements. Write a one-sentence description of the scene and record the time of the scene.

Example: from 1:05:00 to 1:10:00.

Explain why you chose this scene.

PLACE THE TIME STAMP FROM THE SCENE HERE… Example: 00:00:00 – 00:05:00

 

16. In the selected scene: write a sentence for each of the elements below to justify why this scene best represents the film:
a. Screenwriting:
b. Sound Design:
c. Camera Movements/Angles:
d. Light Setup:
e. Soundtrack/Score:
18. What’s the socio-cultural context of this film?

This worksheet was developed with ideas from many IB Film teachers, thus should remain in the Creative Commons

Mr. Le Duc’s Film Analysis Resources

Film Analysis: The Handmaid’s Tale

Summary

  • IN ONE TO TWO SENTENCES, DESCRIBE WHAT FILM YOU ANALYZED FOR THIS PROJECT AND WHY YOU CHOSE IT
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s ALL UPPERCASE INSTRUCTIONS ABOVE

Film Analysis

Film Title
The Handmaid’s Tale
Year 2017
Director
Reed Morano
Country
USA
Genre Drama | Sci-Fi | Thriller
If you could work on this film (change it), what would you change and why?

Film information can be found at imdb.com

As you view films, consider how the cuts, camera angles, shots, and movement work to create particular meanings. Think about how they establish space, privilege certain characters, suggest relationships, and emphasize themes. In addition to shot distances, angles, editing, and camera movement, note details of the narrative, setting, characters, lighting, props, costume, tone, and sound.

Ask yourself the following questions:

TOPIC YOUR NOTES
1. Who is the protagonist?
2. Who is the antagonist?
3. What is the conflict?
4. What is the theme or central, unifying concept? (summarize in one or two words)
5. How is the story told (linear, non-linear, with flashbacks, flash-forwards, at regular intervals)
6. What “happens” in the plot (Brief description)?
7. How does the film influence particular reactions on the part of viewers (sound, editing,
characterization, camera movement, etc.)? Why does the film encourage such
reactions?
8. Is the setting realistic or stylized? What atmosphere does the setting suggest? Do particular objects or settings serve symbolic functions?
9. How are the characters costumed and made-up? What does their clothing or makeup reveal about their social standing, ethnicity, nationality, gender, or age? How do costume and makeup convey character?
10. How does the lighting design shape our perception of character, space, or mood?
11. How do camera angles and camera movements shape our view of characters or spaces? What do you see cinematically?
12. What is the music’s purpose in the film? How does it direct our attention within the image? How does it shape our interpretation of the image? What stands out about the music?
13. How might industrial, social, and economic factors have influenced the film? Describe how this film influences or connects to a culture?
14. Give an example of what a film critic had to say about this film. Use credible sources and cite sources.

Example: “The Shawshank Redemption Movie Review (1994) | Roger Ebert.” All Content. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 June 2015.

15. Select one scene no longer than 5 minutes that represents well the whole film and shows relevant cinematic elements. Write a one-sentence description of the scene and record the time of the scene.

Example: from 1:05:00 to 1:10:00.

Explain why you chose this scene.

PLACE THE TIME STAMP FROM THE SCENE HERE… Example: 00:00:00 – 00:05:00

 

16. In the selected scene: write a sentence for each of the elements below to justify why this scene best represents the film:
a. Screenwriting:
b. Sound Design:
c. Camera Movements/Angles:
d. Light Setup:
e. Soundtrack/Score:
18. What’s the socio-cultural context of this film?

This worksheet was developed with ideas from many IB Film teachers, thus should remain in the Creative Commons

Mr. Le Duc’s Film Analysis Resources

Film Analysis: Across The Universe

Summary

  • IN ONE TO TWO SENTENCES, DESCRIBE WHAT FILM YOU ANALYZED FOR THIS PROJECT AND WHY YOU CHOSE IT
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s ALL UPPERCASE INSTRUCTIONS ABOVE

Film Analysis

Film Title
Across The Universe
Year 2007
Director
Julie Taymor
Country
USA | UK
Genre Drama | Fantasy | History | Music | Musical | Romance
If you could work on this film (change it), what would you change and why?

Film information can be found at imdb.com

As you view films, consider how the cuts, camera angles, shots, and movement work to create particular meanings. Think about how they establish space, privilege certain characters, suggest relationships, and emphasize themes. In addition to shot distances, angles, editing, and camera movement, note details of the narrative, setting, characters, lighting, props, costume, tone, and sound.

Ask yourself the following questions:

TOPIC YOUR NOTES
1. Who is the protagonist?
2. Who is the antagonist?
3. What is the conflict?
4. What is the theme or central, unifying concept? (summarize in one or two words)
5. How is the story told (linear, non-linear, with flashbacks, flash-forwards, at regular intervals)
6. What “happens” in the plot (Brief description)?
7. How does the film influence particular reactions on the part of viewers (sound, editing,
characterization, camera movement, etc.)? Why does the film encourage such
reactions?
8. Is the setting realistic or stylized? What atmosphere does the setting suggest? Do particular objects or settings serve symbolic functions?
9. How are the characters costumed and made-up? What does their clothing or makeup reveal about their social standing, ethnicity, nationality, gender, or age? How do costume and makeup convey character?
10. How does the lighting design shape our perception of character, space, or mood?
11. How do camera angles and camera movements shape our view of characters or spaces? What do you see cinematically?
12. What is the music’s purpose in the film? How does it direct our attention within the image? How does it shape our interpretation of the image? What stands out about the music?
13. How might industrial, social, and economic factors have influenced the film? Describe how this film influences or connects to a culture?
14. Give an example of what a film critic had to say about this film. Use credible sources and cite sources.

Example: “The Shawshank Redemption Movie Review (1994) | Roger Ebert.” All Content. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 June 2015.

15. Select one scene no longer than 5 minutes that represents well the whole film and shows relevant cinematic elements. Write a one-sentence description of the scene and record the time of the scene.

Example: from 1:05:00 to 1:10:00.

Explain why you chose this scene.

PLACE THE TIME STAMP FROM THE SCENE HERE… Example: 00:00:00 – 00:05:00

 

16. In the selected scene: write a sentence for each of the elements below to justify why this scene best represents the film:
a. Screenwriting:
b. Sound Design:
c. Camera Movements/Angles:
d. Light Setup:
e. Soundtrack/Score:
18. What’s the socio-cultural context of this film?

This worksheet was developed with ideas from many IB Film teachers, thus should remain in the Creative Commons

Mr. Le Duc’s Film Analysis Resources

Jordan Mitchell’s Guide to the CS

JORDAN’S CS

CREATE AN OUTLINE

  • Put notes into an outline and/or a basic Venn diagram
    • One side is film number one and the other side film number two
    • Add what’s similar and what’s different
  • This will help you shape what parts you want to talk about in your task components

WATCH FILMS AND TAKE NOTES

Pick a film you know and/or love

  • The first time you watch it, just watch it passively, enjoy it, and don’t overthink it

Keep a journal and jot down notes

  1. Track of the big themes related to your Genre or Film Theory
  2. Keep in mind how you are feeling as a viewer
    • Don’t just focus on the film technique
    • Focus on how it makes you feel
      • It’s easy because you don’t know what’s coming if you haven’t seen it before if you have try to remember your first impressions of these scenes
    • If there are points where you feel anxious, laugh out loud, are excited about the character, jot that down
      • These are important things to know
  3. If there are any interesting things that catch your eye, even if you don’t know why jot them down
  4. Later go back and analyze why you feel that way

Watch a second film and analyze it to see if it fits your film focus

  • Watch it a second time and be more detailed in your note-taking
  • Pause and re-watch some key scenes for key film techniques and things that relate to your film focus and things that interest you or catch your eye.

CRITERION A – TASK COMPONENTS (12/32)

“The student provides a credible and persuasive justification for the choice of task components.”

  • Write a paragraph stating justification for why these two films are worthy of study
  • Have a sentence about how each film relates to that topic

“The student demonstrates an effective and highly appropriate knowledge and understanding of the identified task components and cultural context of the two selected films. The student analyzes the cultural context of the selected films and provides a credible and persuasive justification for the choice of task components.”

  1. You have researched your cultural context
  2. You know how they apply to your focus
  3. Show that you know what your area of focus means
    • shots used in your genre, common themes among your film theory, etc.

“The student references an effective range of sources that are highly appropriate adding to the critical perspectives explored in the work.”

Use a range of sources

  1. Some that talk about your film genre, film focus, and actual film techniques
  2. Some that talk about the society and the cultural context
  3. Some about the actual film that you’re studying (articles about people’s reaction to the film and film reviews)

CRITERION B – COMPARING AND CONTRASTING (12/32)

“The student effectively analyzes how the two films connected to each other and to the chosen topic providing insightful accurate and relevant observations regarding similarities and differences.”

  • Talk about specific characteristics of your film focus and compare and contrast them to the two films
    • Example: Jordan focused compare and contrast the topics of McGuffins and discomfort

For any key point you make, you want to…

  1. WHAT: Relate it to your film topic
  2. WHY: Relate it to film technique with specific film language
  3. HOW: Compare / contrast both films
  4. SO WHAT: Justify it with the cultural context

“The comparative study is consistently and effectively supported with accurate film vocabulary.”

  1. Throw in film language “buzz words”
    • Narration Example: “The use of close-ups and extreme close-ups are used to portray the character’s emotions and make the audience feel uncomfortable.”
  2. Show visual evidence of film language “buzz words”
    • Visual Evidence Example: Show those shots to prove that you actually know what a close-up is.

CRITERION C – ASSEMBLING THE CS (8/32)

“To what extent does the student assemble the comparative study in a clear, logical, audible and visually appropriate manner?”

“To what extent does the student provide an equal treatment of the two films selected for study?”

RECORDING NARRATION

  • Record audio in a quiet room, a closet, or under a blanket
    • Your phone is fine
  • Reduce background noise
  • Have consistent volume levels should be throughout
  • Cut out blank spaces or pauses
  • Make sure your recording should be between nine and ten minutes

BUILDING THE VIDEO ESSAY

Training

  • Know how to cut, splice, rearrange clips, add text, and change the volume of audio
  • Look on YouTube for the basics of your film software
  • No points for making it look flashy
  • No transitions

Workflow

  • Give equal consideration to the two films throughout the comparative study
    • As close to 50% screen time for each
  • Start with the easy stuff
    • For example: if you’re talking about a specific scene or specific shot then obviously you want to show that shot
  • Have some of the movie volume in the background (Recommended)
    • It sounds better, super low like room tone
    • If you want, search on YouTube how to do underwater audio effects to muffles the words
  • Place random scenes that you think look cool from the movie To fill extra spaces
  • If it fits, add little bits of movie dialogue between your thoughts
  • If you have quotes from an interview try to find the video of that interview
    • Don’t just read it aloud. It makes it a little bit more engaging
    • If you have a key point that you want to make try to just put text on the screen as a quote
  • Use lower thirds as onscreen citations
    • Google ‘lower third template’ for your editing software
    • You can just drag and drop and change the text easily
  • The slate at the beginning has to look like this like the examples
    • Don’t modify or stylize the slate
    • The beginning slate needs to be exactly 10 seconds