IB Text Analysis Worksheet: TEMPLATE

“Director/Conductor” by La Chachalaca Fotografía is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Summary

A guide to planning, researching, and creating your IB Film Text Analysis

  • Follow the directions for each step below
  • Include for your notes, where required

Student Work

Across The Universe

Pan’s Labyrinth

Handmaid’s Tale

Guidance for Your Work

The TA is an exam. Failure to turn in the work within the 4 weeks, unless the teacher requests extenuating circumstances directly from the IB, should be considered a fail.” – IB Film

13.5 Hours To Complete

  • Please track how long it took you for each stage

Step 1 – Preparation: Spend 2 Hours

Total Time:

Step 2 – Pick a Film, Watch It, and Write Notes: Spend 4.5 Hours

Total Time:

The goal of IB Film is to expose students to films from all over the world and to increase their critical and practical understanding of film as a creative art form and reflection of its time period, society, and political and cultural environment. As a result, this class requires the viewing of a wide variety of films. In some cases, these films may carry an R rating, or, in the case of films made before 1968 and some foreign films, will have no rating at all. Please be assured that all the films selected for this course have a high degree of artistic merit and that many have won numerous awards and are considered part of the film canon. However, if you object to any film shown that does carry an “R” rating, you will always have the opportunity to request that an alternative film be assigned, and/or be excused from class and not view the film.

  1. Watch the trailers and pick ONE of these films (or the two episodes) (10 minutes)
    • Pan’s Labyrinth [Spain/Mexico] Director Guillermo Del Toro 2006 (Rated R)
      • Trailer
      • Available on Netflix and other streaming services
      • Google Drive (Film and Commentary)
    • Across the Universe [USA] Director Julie Taymor 2007 (Rated PG-13)
      • Trailer
      • Available on Hulu and other streaming services
      • Google Drive (Film, Commentary, and Extra Features)
    • The Handmaid’s Tale, Season 1 Ep. 01 and 02 [USA] Director Reed Morano 2017 (Rated R – Mature Rating on Hulu)
  2. Review Drew’s TA Guide Sheet (he scored very high!) (10 minutes)
  3. First Viewing: Watch the film and record your reactions (2 hours)
    • Take notes (below in this post)
      • How does the film (various scenes) affect you?
      • Remember every scene is like a mini-movie
      • Pay attention to which scene best represents the film, for you
  4. Second Viewing: Notice the cinematography, mise en scene, actor movement, wardrobe, sound (diegetic, non-diegetic, music, etc.) choices (2 hours)
    • Review the Big List of Film Terms for cinematic elements, mise en scene (what’s represented on screen), and sound
    • Write notes (below in this post)

Step 3 – Choose Your Extract, Watch It, Write Notes, and Research: 2.5 hours

Total Time:

  1. Open your TA Bibliography Google Doc (In Your IB Google Drive Folder – Mr. Le Duc created)
    • You will add your MLA sources as you research
  2. Choose your 5-minute extract (scene)
  3. Re-watch this scene numerous times and write notes in the Task Analysis Guide (below) (15 minutes)
  4. Research to support your notes (1 hour)
      • Cultural context Evidence: Textual analysis and sources
        • Answer these questions:
          • To what extent do you demonstrate an understanding of the cultural context of the film text?
          • To what extent do you support your understanding of the cultural context with research from appropriate and relevant sources?
    • Add to your notes in the Task Analysis Guide
  5. Re-watch your scene numerous times and add to your notes (15 minutes)
  6. Research to support your notes (1 hour)
    • Re-read Criterion B Film Elements Rubric
      • Evidence: Textual analysis and sources
        • To what extent do you evaluate how the extract makes use of film elements to convey meaning in the chosen film?
        • To what extent do you support your observations with the appropriate use of relevant film vocabulary?
    • Write notes (below in this post)

Step 4 – Compose A Rough Draft using The Text Analysis Guide: 2 hours

Total Time:

  1. Watch Mr. Le Duc’s Convert a Table into Text with Editpad.org tutorial and do the following: (5 minutes)
    1. Copy and paste the two columns of your Text Analysis Guide notes (below) into editpad.org
      • This will convert your two-column table layout into a regular text document
    2. Copy and paste from editpad.org into your Google Docs TA Paper Template
  2. Thoroughly re-read and examine your work with the Text Analysis Rubric (PDF) (10 minutes)
  3. Compose your rough draft (1.75 hours)
    • Weave in your research the following
    • WHAT: Your observation about a film element in the 5-minute scene
    • WHY: Relate the film element to the shot or scene’s emotional or narrative importance
    • HOW: Explain how the film element works in the context of this scene
    • SO WHAT: Justify it with the cultural context, as needed

Text Analysis Guide (For your 5 Minute Scene)

TASK COMPONENTS (INQUIRY)

NOTES
The extract may be up to five minutes in length and must be a single, continuous sequence of the film
Time of 5-minute clip PLACE 5 MINUTE TIME INTERVAL HERE…

PART 1 –  The film, your scene, why it is of interest, and how your scene relates to the whole film.

Brief Summary of Exposition

Writer, Director, Producer, studio, year released Main characters, conflict, identify the genre. Identify the aspect ratio.

Context of Extract in Film – briefly describe the scene

At what times does your scene occur, how it begins, and how it ends. Do not describe it further. The judges have seen the movie.

The Rationale for Selection – relation to the entire movie

Why is it interesting and why does this scene best illustrate the themes of the whole movie?

PART 2 – Remember to integrate the Director’s intent with each of the following areas in this section

Narrative

Script – Not just dialogue but in terms of being the spine of the story

Explain how this scene advances the plot. How do the events of this scene clarify/complicate matters? How does this scene affect/cause future events? What new information is revealed or suggested about a character? Is there anything deliberately withheld? Anything unusual in the dialogue? Word choice? Delivery? Accents? Repetition?

Cinema Photography

a) Camerawork – describe shots in specific terms

Shot size: ELS, LS (stage), full shot, MS, CU, ECU. Camera angles: bird’s eye, high angle, eye level, low angle or Dutch (oblique), camera movement: pan, tilt, dolly or tracking, handheld, Steadycam, or moving crane. Invisible V conspicuous. Are tracking shots motivated by character movement?

b) Composition

Open/closed composition, aspect ratio, rule of thirds, Kubrick single-point perspective.

c) Depth of Field

Consider foreground, mid, ground, and background. Deep focus is associated with wide-angle lenses. Could be flat. Narrow ranges of focus may be the result of telephoto lenses.

Mise-en-scene – The overall look and feel of a movie

a) Position of characters and objects

Identify the dominant, does movement guide our focus, character proxemics patterns (intimate,  personal, social, and public distances). How does the director add meaning to these choices? Is one character encroaching on another’s space? Watch for space being used to portray relationships/changes in relationships. Watch for windows, doors, parallel lines that frame people or objects.  Entrapment. Look for actor placement. Front – actor facing camera, greatest intimacy. One-Quarter Turn – very popular. Profile – character lost in the moment, a bit more distant than the previous two. Three Quarters Turn – useful to convey anti, socialness, Back of Head, most anonymous shot.  Creates a mystery or feeling of alienation.

b) Lighting

Low or high key. How does the director use light to focus our attention? Key, fill, and backlighting. What is the source of lighting in the context of the scene?

c) Color scheme

How does the director use color and what is the director’s intent for doing so? Look for color symbolism or color associated with characters. Color to suggest a mood. Color as foreshadowing. Contrasting colors ( the monolith v white room)

d) Set/location/props

Set design. Studio or on, location, describe props, scenery, what was the Director ́s intent for using them? How dense is visual information? Stark, moderate, or highly detailed?

e) Costume, hair, make up

Period, class, gender (emphasize or diminish), age-appropriate, silhouette (close-fitting or baggy), fabric (plain, sheer, rough, delicate), accessories. Color is very important in relation to character.

f) Acting/body language

Acting style, body language, blocking, period, or contemporary. Individualized (Joker), Stylization. Look for subtext (character says one thing but means something else). Consider typecasting as a shortcut to characterization.

Sound – watch scene w/o picture

Live sound, sound effects, and music. Sound can be diegetic, meaning characters would hear it, or non, diegetic, meaning that characters would not hear it, such as narration or music over the credits. Explore the relationship between diegetic and non, diegetic sound when appropriate.

Music

Is the music telling you what to feel?  Music can be used as a counterpoint to the action.

Editing

Ellipsis (time compression) and cross-cutting, fades, dissolves (fades between scenes), wipes,  matching cuts, straight cuts, dialogue overlap, and sound bridges. Consider how long each shot lasts.

Part 3: Analyzing the Film as a Product

Sociocultural Context

In what way was this movie a product of its time? What does the audience learn about the culture or historical context of the film?

Target Audience

Teens/adults or male/female age group, college education art crowd, liberal, conservative, Christian

Generic Expectations

http://www.filmsite.org/filmgenres.html also research  http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/Tropes

Themes

Man V Man, or one of the others, is this film an allegory?

Motifs/Symbols

What specific devices support your definition of the theme? Look for recurring elements.

Film Criticism

Both contemporary and current. Use brief quotes from two different sources. Record the details:  reviewers’ names and publication names/dates

TASK COMPONENTS (ACTION)

Compose Paper

Part 4: Sources

Source 1
Source 2
Source 3
Source 4
Source 5
Source 6
Source 7
Source 8
Source 9
Source 10

TASK COMPONENTS (REFLECTION)

Revision 1 Proofreader:
Revision 2 Proofreader:
Revision 3 Mr. Le Duc

Step 5 – Get Draft Peer Reviewed: 30 Minutes

Total Time:

  1. Get it peer-reviewed with the TA Worksheet (PDF) (30 minutes)
    • Peer Reviewer: Look for evidence of each section of the document
    • Look for WHAT, WHY, HOW for each statement in the paper
      • There should be at least one WHY or HOW or every WHAT statement
    • Look for cited research to support statements, where it makes sense
    • Write comments to help the author
      • Add them as “Add Comments” on the side, so you do not add to the word count of the document

Step 6 – Revise: 1 Hour

Total Time:

  1. Revise your draft (1 hour)

Step 7 – Get Feedback from Mr. Le Duc and Revise: 30 Minutes

Total Time:

  1. Get feedback from Mr. Le Duc
  2. Make final revisions and check format (30 Minutes)

Step 8 – Finalize Paper and Cover Page: 15 Minutes

Total Time:

  1. Clear cover page with the Title of Film & Timecode (5-minute film extract)
  2. Sans serif 12 point font
  3. In-text citations
  4. Less than 1,750 words maximum

Step 9 – Finalize Bibliography and Check Format: 15 Minutes

Total Time:

  1. Update your TA Bibliography Google Doc (In Your IB Google Drive Folder)
    • Finish and check the format of your MLA sources as you research

Step 10 – Upload to Turnitin.com: 10 Minutes

Total Time:

  1. Upload your TA paper (from Your IB Google Drive Folder)
  2. Upload your TA Bibliography Google Doc (from Your IB Google Drive Folder)

External Assessment Criteria SL and HL

Peer Review Checklist

Production Project TEMPLATE

SUMMARY

Role:

Intention (SMART Goal)

PRE-PRODUCTION – INQUIRY

Leader(s) in the Field / Exemplary Work(s)

Training Source(s)

Project Timeline

Proposed Budget

PRODUCTION – ACTION

The (FILM, SOUND, or GAME Creation)

Skills Commentary

POST-PRODUCTION – REFLECTION

21st Century Skills

Ways of Thinking (Creativity, Innovation, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving)

Ways of Working (Communication & Collaboration)

Tools for Working (Info & Media Literacy)

Ways of Living in the World (Life & Career)

Reactions to the Final Version

Self-Evaluation of Final Version

What I Learned and Problems I Solved

Grammar and Spelling

Editor

Song Analysis Worksheet: TEMPLATE

Summary

  • IN ONE TO TWO SENTENCES, DESCRIBE WHAT SONG YOU ANALYZED FOR THIS PROJECT AND WHY YOU CHOSE IT
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s ALL UPPERCASE INSTRUCTIONS ABOVE

Song Analysis

TOPIC MY RESPONSES
SONG TITLE PLACE YOUR RESPONSES IN THIS COLUMN (DELETE THIS MESSAGE BEFORE YOU WRITE)
COMPOSER(S)
YEAR
COUNTRY
If you could work on this song (change it), what would you change and why?
What is the song GENRE?
What is the song KEY?
What is the song TEMPO?
What do you like about the RHYTHM?
What do you like about the ARRANGEMENT?
What do you like about the MIX?
What do you like about the TIMBRE of some or all of the instruments?
What do you like about the PITCH of some or all of the instruments or vocals?
Are there particular TRACK(S) that stand out?
Finally, what do you like about the overall COMPOSITION?

“A song is a musical composition intended to be performed by the human voice. This is often done at distinct and fixed pitches (melodies) using patterns of sound and silence. Songs contain various forms, such as those including the repetition and variation of sections.” wikipedia.org/wiki/Song

HookTheory for Learning About Song Structure

Holistic Songwriting’s Artist Analysis

  • This YouTube series dives into the songwriting web.
  • Marketing, Lighting, Music Videos, Image…

Mr. Le Duc’s Song Analysis Resources

Game Analysis Worksheet: TEMPLATE

Summary

  • IN ONE TO TWO SENTENCES, DESCRIBE WHAT GAME YOU ANALYZED FOR THIS PROJECT AND WHY YOU CHOSE IT
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s ALL UPPERCASE INSTRUCTIONS ABOVE

Game Play Analysis

Formal Elements

The Basics

REMINDER: PLACE YOUR RESPONSES IN THIS COLUMN (DELETE THIS MESSAGE BEFORE YOU WRITE)

Name of the game
The platform
Time played (should be at least 30 minutes)
If you could work on this game (change it), what would you change and why?

Players

NOTES
How many players are supported?
Does it need to be an exact number?
How does this affect play?
Some types of player frameworks:

  • Single Player – like Solitare.
  • Head-to-head – 1 vs. 1, Chess.
  • PvE – Player vs. Environment, or multiple players vs. the game. Common in MMOs like World of Warcraft.
  • One against Many – Single-player vs. multiple (obvy).
  • Free-for-all – Every man for himself (1 vs. 1 vs. 1 vs. 1..). Most common for multiplayer games, from Monopoly to Modern Warfare.
  • Individuals Against the System – Like Blackjack, where the Dealer is playing against multiple players, but those players have no effect on each other.
  • Team Competition – Multiple vs. multiple, i.e. sports.
  • Predator-prey – Players form a circle and everyone’s goal is to attack the player on their left and defend themselves from the player on their right.
  • Five-pointed Star – Eliminate both players who are not on either side of you.

Objectives/Goals

NOTES
What are the players trying to do?
Some common objectives include:

  • Capture/Destroy – Eliminate all your opponents pieces (Chess).
  • Territorial Acquisition – Control as much territory as you can, not necessarily harming other players (RISK).
  • Collection – Collect a certain number of objects throughout the game (Pokemon).
  • Solve – Solve a puzzle or crime (Clue).
  • Chase/race/escape – Anything where you are running towards or away from something (playground game Tag).
  • Spatial Alignment – Anything involving the positioning of elements (Tetris or Tic-Tac-Toe or that game at Cracker Barrel).
  • Build – Advance your characters or build your resources to a certain point (The Sims).
  • Negation of another goal – The game ends if you perform an act that is forbidden by the rules (Jenga or Twister).

Rules/Mechanics

There are three categories of (what the book Rules of Play calls) operational rules:

  • Setup – the things you do at the beginning of a game.
  • Progression of Play – what happens during the game.
  • Resolution – How an outcome is determined based on the game state.

Controls

NOTES
What controls are used?
Was there a clear introductory tutorial?
Were they easy to understand or did you find yourself spamming the controller?

Resources & Resource Management

NOTES
What kinds of resources do players control?
How are they maintained during play?
What is their role?
A resource is everything under the control of a single player. Could be the money in Monopoly or health in WoW. Other examples are:

  • Territory in RISK The number of questions remaining in 20 Questions Objects picked up during videogames (guns, health packs, etc.)
  • Time (game time, real-time, or both)
  • Known information (like suspects in Clue)

Game State

NOTES
How much information in the game state is visible to the player?
A snapshot of the game at a single point is the game state. The resources you have, the un-owned properties in Monopoly, your opponent’s Archery skill all count towards the game state. Some example information structures are:

  • Total Information – Nothing is hidden, like Chess.
  • Info per player – Your hand of cards is only visible to you.
  • One player has privileged info – Like a Dungeon Master.
  • The game hides info from all players – Like Clue, where no one knows the victory condition.
  • Fog of War – In video games, where certain sections of the map are concealed if you do not have a unit in sight range of that area. You also cannot see other players’ screens, so each player is unaware of the other’s information.

Sequencing

NOTES
In what order do players take their actions?
How does play flow from one action to another?
Some structures include:

  • Turn-based – Standard board game technique.
  • Turn-based with simultaneous play – where everyone takes their turn at the same time (like writing something down or putting a card down in War).
  • Real-time – Actions happen as fast as players can make them. Action-based video games.
  • Turn-based and time limits – You have this long to take your turn.

Player Interaction

Some examples:

  • Direct Conflict – I attack you.
  • Negotiation – If you support me here, I’ll help you there.
  • Trading – I’ll give you this for that.
  • Information Sharing – If you go there, I’m warning you, a trap will go off.

Theme & Narrative

NOTES
Does it have an actual story structure?
Is it based on a historical event (or similar)?
Does the theme or narrative help you know how to play?
Does it have emotional impacts?
Also, look for en media res (does it start in the middle of the game)?

The Elements in Motion

NOTES
How do the different elements interact?
What is the gameplay like?
Is it effective?
Are there any points where the design choices break down?

Design Critique

NOTES
Why did the designer make these particular choices?
Why this set of resources?
What if they made different decisions?
Does the design break down at any point?

Graphics & Sound

NOTES
Does the game art pair well with the mechanics?
Did you find any bugs or glitches?
What about sound?
Can you spot any technical shortcuts?

Various Stages of the Game

NOTES
To wrap up, some things to keep in mind (as if there aren’t enough already) as you play:
What challenges do you face, and how do you overcome them?
Is the game fair?
Is it replayable? Are there multiple paths to victory or optional rules that can change the experience?
What is the intended audience?
What is the core, the one thing you do over and over, and is it fun?

This analysis form was adapted from https://notlaura.com/a-template-for-analyzing-game-design/

Resources

Books

Mr. Le Duc’s Game Analysis Resources

Game Design – Week 14 – Intro to Analysis

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

“Judy Garland, Hedy Lamarr and Lana Turner” by classic film scans is licensed under CC BY 2.0

“Analysis gave me great freedom of emotions and fantastic confidence. I felt I had served my time as a puppet.”

Hedy Lamarr

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 2 hours in this ‘room’
  • Play games of your own choice

After Playing The Game for an Hour-ish…

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 30 minutes creating the post detailed below…
  1. Create a blog post titled, Game Analysis: NAME OF GAME
  2. Copy and paste the template from mrleduc.edublogs.org/2020/12/07/game-analysis-worksheet-template/
  3. Embed an interesting Creative Commons image at the top of your post, if you want
  4. Fill in the blog post
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

OUTSIDE (CREATIVITY, PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 15 minutes in this ‘room’
Image from bananatreelog.com

  • Go for a 10-minute walk, if it is safe to do so 
    • Reflect on how ‘This guide can give you some tips to remain calm and practice self-care to maintain your mental health.
  • Writing a small paragraph reflection for 10 minutes
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

ARCADE

  • Play game(s) of your choice for the analysis part of this week

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

School of Rock – Week 14 – Intro to Analysis

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

“Day 94 – music analysis on a road trip #100daysofdatasketches #the100dayproject” by Kelly-Ann’s Pics! is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

“Theory is a six-letter dirty word to most musicians, but hey, musicians love dirty words, right? And just like all the other dirty words, theory is easy to learn and fun to use!”
― Ray Harmony, Hack Music Theory, Part 1: Learn Scales & Chords in 30 minutes

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend  30 minutes in this ‘room’
  • Listen to a song of your own choice
  1. Create a blog post titled, Song Analysis: NAME OF SONG
  2. Copy and paste the template from mrleduc.edublogs.org/2020/12/07/song-analysis-worksheet-template/
  3. Embed an interesting Creative Commons image at the top of your post, if you want
  4. Fill in the blog post
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

OUTSIDE (CREATIVITY, PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 15 minutes in this ‘room’
Image from bananatreelog.com

  • Go for a 10-minute walk, if it is safe to do so 
    • Reflect on how ‘This guide can give you some tips to remain calm and practice self-care to maintain your mental health.
  • Writing a small paragraph reflection for 10 minutes
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

CONCERT

  • Listen to a song of your choice, for the analysis blog post this week

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

Film – Week 14 – Intro to Analysis

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

“Judy Garland, Hedy Lamarr and Lana Turner” by classic film scans is licensed under CC BY 2.0

“Analysis gave me great freedom of emotions and fantastic confidence. I felt I had served my time as a puppet.”

Hedy Lamarr – Read about 1930s actress Hedy Lamarr-inventor of cellphones, Wi-Fi and GPS

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 2 hours in this ‘room’
  • Watch a film of your own choice

After Watching The Film…

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 30 minutes in this ‘room’
  1. Create a blog post titled, Film Analysis: NAME OF FILM
  2. Copy and paste the template from mrleduc.edublogs.org/2020/12/06/film-analysis-template/
  3. Embed an interesting Creative Commons image at the top of your post, if you want
  4. Fill in the blog post
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

OUTSIDE (CREATIVITY, PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 15 minutes in this ‘room’
Image from bananatreelog.com

  • Go for a 10-minute walk, if it is safe to do so 
    • Reflect on how ‘This guide can give you some tips to remain calm and practice self-care to maintain your mental health.
  • Writing a small paragraph reflection for 10 minutes
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

THEATER

  • Watch a film, of your choice, for the analysis part of this blog post

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

Film Analysis Worksheet: TEMPLATE

Summary

  • IN ONE TO TWO SENTENCES, DESCRIBE WHAT FILM YOU ANALYZED FOR THIS PROJECT AND WHY YOU CHOSE IT
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s ALL UPPERCASE INSTRUCTIONS ABOVE

Film Analysis

Film Title
PLACE YOUR RESPONSES IN THIS COLUMN (DELETE THIS MESSAGE BEFORE YOU WRITE)
Year
Director
Country
Genre
If you could work on this film (change it), what would you change and why?

Film information can be found at imdb.com

As you view films, consider how the cuts, camera angles, shots, and movement work to create particular meanings. Think about how they establish space, privilege certain characters, suggest relationships, and emphasize themes. In addition to shot distances, angles, editing, and camera movement, note details of the narrative, setting, characters, lighting, props, costume, tone, and sound.

Ask yourself the following questions:

TOPIC YOUR NOTES
1. Who is the protagonist?
2. Who is the antagonist?
3. What is the conflict?
4. What is the theme or central, unifying concept? (summarize in one or two words)
5. How is the story told (linear, non-linear, with flashbacks, flash-forwards, at regular intervals)
6. What “happens” in the plot (Brief description)?
7. How does the film influence particular reactions on the part of viewers (sound, editing,
characterization, camera movement, etc.)? Why does the film encourage such
reactions?
8. Is the setting realistic or stylized? What atmosphere does the setting suggest? Do particular objects or settings serve symbolic functions?
9. How are the characters costumed and made-up? What does their clothing or makeup reveal about their social standing, ethnicity, nationality, gender, or age? How do costume and makeup convey character?
10. How does the lighting design shape our perception of character, space, or mood?
11. How do camera angles and camera movements shape our view of characters or spaces? What do you see cinematically?
12. What is the music’s purpose in the film? How does it direct our attention within the image? How does it shape our interpretation of the image? What stands out about the music?
13. How might industrial, social, and economic factors have influenced the film? Describe how this film influences or connects to a culture?
14. Give an example of what a film critic had to say about this film. Use credible sources and cite sources.

Example: “The Shawshank Redemption Movie Review (1994) | Roger Ebert.” All Content. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 June 2015.

15. Select one scene no longer than 5 minutes that represents well the whole film and shows relevant cinematic elements. Write a one-sentence description of the scene and record the time of the scene.

Example: from 1:05:00 to 1:10:00.

Explain why you chose this scene.

PLACE THE TIME STAMP FROM THE SCENE HERE… Example: 00:00:00 – 00:05:00

 

16. In the selected scene: write a sentence for each of the elements below to justify why this scene best represents the film:
a. Screenwriting:
b. Sound Design:
c. Camera Movements/Angles:
d. Light Setup:
e. Soundtrack/Score:
18. What’s the socio-cultural context of this film?

This worksheet was developed with ideas from many IB Film teachers, thus should remain in the Creative Commons

Mr. Le Duc’s Film Analysis Resources

Game Design – Week 13 – Changes

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

“The successful free to play games are selling positive emotions. Not content.” – Nicholas Lovell

“It should be the experience, that is touching. What I strive for is to make the person playing the game the director.” – Shigeru Miyamoto

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

PRACTICE ROOM (TUTORIALS)

Screenshot from Sololearn.com
  • Set a timer for 30 minutes in this ‘room’
    • Continue with either ONE of the scripting languages below, Javascript (Construct 3 / PlayCanvas) or C# (Unity)  (NOT BOTH)

Construct 3 – Javascript

Unity – C#

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

Screenshot from Extra Credits Channel
MDA image from Wikipedia

MDA Notes

  • Mechanics
  • Dynamics
  • Aesthetics

LAB (THEORY PRACTICED)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 15 minutes
  • According to Wikipedia:
    • Mechanics are the base components of the game – its rules, every basic action the player can take in the game, the algorithms and data structures in the game engine etc.
    • Dynamics are the run-time behavior of the mechanics acting on player input and “cooperating” with other mechanics.
    • Aesthetics are the emotional responses evoked in the player.

Brainstorm Ideas for Each of the Eight Categories

  • At least one idea per category, but feel free to add more you your favorite categories
  • Write a short sentence for each idea with these three elements included in each description
    • Someone or thing fighting/struggling against Someone or thing for Someone or thing

DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

  1. Sensation (Game as sense-pleasure): The player enjoys memorable audio-visual effects.
    • Place idea here…
  2. Fantasy (Game as make-believe): Imaginary world.
    • Place idea here…
  3. Narrative (Game as drama): A story that drives the player to keep coming back
    • Place idea here…
  4. Challenge (Game as obstacle course): Urge to master something. Boosts a game’s replayability.
    • Place idea here…
  5. Fellowship (Game as social framework): A community where the player is an active part of it. Almost exclusive for multiplayer games.
    • Place idea here…
  6. Discovery (Game as uncharted territory): Urge to explore the game world.
    • Place idea here…
  7. Expression (Game as self-discovery): Own creativity. For example, creating a character resembling player’s own avatar.
    • Place idea here…
  8. Submission (Game as pastime): Connection to the game, as a whole, despite of constraints.
    • Place idea here…

OUTSIDE (CREATIVITY, PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

 

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 30 minutes in this ‘room’
Worksheet from bananatreelog.com

  • Go for a 10-minute walk, if it is safe to do so 
    • Reflect on this simple way to overcome negative automatic thinking by challenging and reframing the thoughts in a positive way.’
  • Writing a small paragraph reflection for 10 minutes
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

STUDIO (CREATIVITY)

Screenshot from Construct.net
  • Set a timer
  • Spend 30 minutes in this ‘room’
    • Read the Construct Manual Sections
      • Home
      • Getting started
      • Overview
      • Interface
      • Project primitives
      • Tips & guides
      • Behavior reference
      • Plugin reference
      • System reference
      • Scripting
  • Write a couple sentence description of what you learned
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

CONTROL ROOM (PRODUCTION)

Screenshot from Construct.net

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

School of Rock – Week 13 – Changes

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

“Music can name the unnameable and communicate the unknowable.” –  Leonard Bernstein

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

PRACTICE ROOM (GUITAR LESSONS)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 15 minutes in the ‘room’

Chose from the following…

Screenshot from Paul Davids Channel
Screenshot from JustinGuitar.com
Screenshot from JustinGuitar.com
Screenshot from
signalsmusicstudio.com
  • Want a bigger challenge? Complete Jake Lizzio’s 5 blues guitar tutorials
  • Write how far did you get in lessons this week
  • Write a reflection of the key topics that got your attention.
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

How interested in learning more about playing the guitar?

    • 1 (YUCK!)
    • 2 (not really)
    • 3 (sorta interested)
    • 4 (interested)
    • 5 (YES!)

Your score: ?

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

Screenshot from Rick Beato’s Channel

How interested in learning more about music theory and song analysis?

    • 1 (YUCK!)
    • 2 (not really)
    • 3 (sorta interested)
    • 4 (interested)
    • 5 (YES!)

Your score: ?

LAB (THEORY PRACTICED)

Screenshot from HookTheory.com/videos
  • Set a timer
  • Spend 15 minutes in this ‘room’
  • Explore the tutorials (but you do not need to watch all of them – just pick what looks interesting to you) from the:
  • Embed a YouTube video link or links to what you watched
  • Write a reflection of the key topics that got your attention.
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

How interested in learning more about HookLab and HookTab?

    • 1 (YUCK!)
    • 2 (not really)
    • 3 (sorta interested)
    • 4 (interested)
    • 5 (YES!)

Your score: ?

OUTSIDE (CREATIVITY, PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 30 minutes in this ‘room’
Worksheet from bananatreelog.com

  • Go for a 10-minute walk, if it is safe to do so 
    • Reflect on this simple way to overcome negative automatic thinking by challenging and reframing the thoughts in a positive way.’
  • Writing a small paragraph reflection for 10 minutes
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

How interested in learning more about music theory and song analysis?

    • 1 (YUCK!)
    • 2 (not really)
    • 3 (sorta interested)
    • 4 (interested)
    • 5 (YES!)

Your score: ?

STUDIO (SONGWRITING)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 15 minutes
  • Pick one or two…
  • Embed a YouTube video link or links you watched
  • Write a reflection of the key topics that got your attention.
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

How interested in songwriting, song structure, and music production?

    • 1 (YUCK!)
    • 2 (not really)
    • 3 (sorta interested)
    • 4 (interested)
    • 5 (YES!)

Your score: ?

CONTROL ROOM (RECORDING & MIXING)

How interested in recording, engineering (sound effects, EQ), and mixing?

    • 1 (YUCK!)
    • 2 (not really)
    • 3 (sorta interested)
    • 4 (interested)
    • 5 (YES!)

Your score: ?

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE