Film – Week 13 – Changes

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

“The most honest form of filmmaking is to make a film for yourself.”

― Peter Jackson,  Link

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

PRACTICE ROOM (TUTORIALS)

Screenshot from sneakonthelot.com
Screenshot from sneakonthelot.com
  • Set a timer for 60 minutes in this ‘room’

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

Screenshot from The Story of Film Trailer on NetworkReleasing YouTube channel
  • Set a timer
  • Spend 75 minutes in this ‘room’
  • Watch the second episode of The Story of Film and take notes in a separate blog post

Steps

  1. Create a blog post titled, Story of Film – Episode 2 – The Hollywood Dream
  2. Embed an interesting Creative Commons image from Flickr.com at the top of your post
  3. Create a heading 2 titled Notes 
  4. Copy and paste the episode’s referenced films as text with links from The Story of Film: An Odyssey at Wikipedia
  5. Cite your source as Wikipedia and link back to The Story of Film: An Odyssey page
    • Example: “The following material is from Wikipedia.”
  6. Take notes as you watch the episode
  7. Access Episode 2 and begin watching
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

OUTSIDE (CREATIVITY, PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 30 minutes in this ‘room’
Worksheet from bananatreelog.com

  • Go for a 10-minute walk, if it is safe to do so 
    • Reflect on this simple way to overcome negative automatic thinking by challenging and reframing the thoughts in a positive way.’
  • Writing a small paragraph reflection for 10 minutes
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

IB Comparative Study Worksheet: TEMPLATE

“Film scripts for sale in Soho! #newyork #newyorkcity #nyc #movies” by Nat Ireland is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Summary

A guide to planning, researching, and creating your Film Comparative Study

  • Follow the directions for each step below
  • Include for your work where it is required

Student Work

Guidance for Your Work

 

“Simple formative analysis of film elements, no matter how precise or insightful, won’t cut it which is why the research question needs to be crafted in such a way that it provides scope for theoretical and socio-historic exploration. It’s basically an EE in disguise but focusing on two very different textual sources.”

Steps and Tasks

  1. Brainstorm possible films for the task. You must select TWO films from contrasting cultural contexts.
  2. Brainstorm and justify at least three different areas of FILM FOCUS for your two chosen films.
  3. Brainstorm and justify at least two different CULTURAL CONTEXTS for your two chosen films.
  4. Consolidate your ideas and develop at least three different RESEARCH QUESTION topics for your study.
  5. Finalize your choices and select your RESEARCH QUESTION. Choose two films for comparison.
  6. Develop the main arguments you will make about your topic.
  7. Collect evidence from the films that support your argument.
  8. Research secondary sources for information that supports your argument.
  9. Write your Narration and plan the audio-visual components of your video essay.
  10. Record, assemble, and edit your Comparative Study Video Essay.
  11. Create a Works Cited document (separately) once your Comparative Study is finished.

Comparative Study Task Components

For this assessment task, each student identifies, selects, and researches each of the following task components.

  1. TASK 1: One area of film focus.
  2. TASK 2: Two films for comparison from within the chosen area of film focus, one of which originates from a contrasting time (historical) or space (geographical) to the personal context of the student, and the other film identified for comparison must arise from a contrasting cultural context to the first film. Students are required to select films they have not previously studied in depth. The selected films cannot come from the prescribed list of film texts provided for the textual analysis assessment task and, once selected, the films cannot be used by the student in any other assessment task for the DP film course or the extended essay.
  3. TASK 3: A clearly defined topic for a recorded multimedia comparative study, which links both the selected films and the identified area of film focus. Each student should invest time in researching, developing, and honing their topic (which in most cases is likely to be expressed in the form of a research question) to ensure it is clear, focused and concise, in order to provide them with the maximum potential for success in this task. The topic should seek to enrich the student’s understanding of the chosen area of film focus and should avoid a plot-driven approach to the comparison.

The assessment criteria for this task requires students to provide a strong justification for the choice of task components as part of the recorded multimedia comparative study. This includes the student’s justification for how films arise from contrasting cultural contexts.

1. FILM Choices List

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 
Which films are you considering for your final Comparative Study? List as many as you wish below as part of an initial brainstorm. Remember that you must select ​​TWO​​ films from contrasting cultural contexts for this task.

e.g. CITIZEN KANE

Year, Country, and Director of the film.

e.g. 1941, USA, Dir: Orson Welles

2. Areas of FILM FOCUS

Film Focus Possibility – identify the broad focus area and then add specifics (e.g. “THEORY – Auteur theory” or “GENRE – Horror”). Develop at least THREE options…you can create more by adding more rows. Justification for this Film Focus. Be as specific as possible.

3. Chosen CULTURAL CONTEXT

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 

For this assessment task, “cultural context” involves consideration of some of the following factors, some of which may be blended (such as socioeconomic factors).

  • Economic, Geographical, Historical, Institutional, Political, Social, Technological
Identify at least TWO Cultural Context possibilities for your chosen films.
Justification for this Cultural Context. Be as specific as possible.

4. RESEARCH QUESTION Possibilities

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 

Consolidate your thoughts above and develop at least ​THREE​​ different research question possibilities. More are possible by adding additional rows to the table below. FYI these will be shared with the full class for discussion of strengths and weaknesses.

Your Chosen Area of Film Focus Topic for Comparative Study (written as a research question)

5. Final Decisions

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 

Using your topic options in the table above, select ​ONE​​ to be your final topic for this Comparative Study task. NOTE: There are examples from the IB of what this should look like below this table.

Your Chosen Area of Film Focus Film 1 Film 2 Contrasting Cultural Context Topic for Comparative Study practice task (written as a research question)

6. Developing Your Topic

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 
Develop 3-5 main arguments that can be made about your topic based on your research question and chosen film focus. Brainstorm how you could support these arguments within your video essay.

7. Selecting Supporting Evidence (Primary)

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 
Identify at least 15 scenes from your chosen films that will help support the arguments you have outlined above. Screen clip a frame from each scene below. Write notes about how this scene helps support your argument. (These notes will help form your voice-over narration.)

*Add more rows as needed.

8. Selecting Supporting Evidence (Secondary)

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 
Identify at least 3-5 secondary sources (articles, books, websites, video essays, etc.) which provide information that help support your arguments being made. In this column include the specific source citations. Summarize the detailed information from the secondary source that you can use in this column. (You can copy+paste if they are from online sources.)

*Add more rows as needed.

9. Writing Your Narration

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend on the first draft: ? 
  • How much time did you spend on the final draft: ? 

Using the information, scene choices, and external sources you have compiled in steps 6-8, you will now write your voiceover narration and match it up to your chosen visual examples.

Length (</= 10 Minutes)

  • For the final Comparative Study, your narration should be no longer than 10 minutes in length.

Remember that you need to:

  • COMPARE and CONTRAST your two chosen film using the arguments and evidence you identified in parts 6-8, above
  • Begin your narration with a detailed justification for the chosen cultural contrast
  • Use an equal balance of the two selected films.
  • Write in a third-person voice to construct your argument (similar in tone to your Extended Essay and other
    comparative analytical work you have written in Film class).
  • Identify where any WRITTEN TEXT will appear on the screen and highlight this (to reference during the
    creation/editing stage)
Which Visual Evidence/Scenes line up to this part of the narration? Voiceover Narration Ideas

Formatting Guidelines

Screenshot from Celtx.com

10. Assembling the Comparative Study

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 

Now you will collect all media resources needed for the task and construct your video essay.

REQUIRED STEPS

  • Import the digital copy of your chosen films into editing software
  • Identify and extract chosen scenes and clips
  • Place and edit clips into a rough timeline for your video essay
  • Record audio narration (both partners should participate in narrating this practice task)
    into an audio file using recording equipment (Zoom recorders, iPhone, DSLR Rode video
    mic, etc.)
  • Import your recorded narration audio file into your project timeline
  • Assemble, edit and fine-tune clips and narration until your video essay takes shape
  • Create and add any required textual information in the timeline (including black slate at the start)
  • Audio mixing of narration and movie clips (adjust levels so that narration and movie sounds complement each other)
  • Export the final video essay movie file
    • Upload Unlisted draft to YouTube for peer review

11. Create Works Cited

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 
  • Create Works Cited document separately (Google Doc)

Examples of Possible Task Components

Area of film focus Film 1 Film 2 A possible topic for comparative study
Film movement: German Expressionism The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) Edward Scissorhands (1990) How and with what effect are specific film elements of German expressionism used within a chosen contemporary film?
Film movement: French New Wave Breathless (1960) Badlands (1973) The influence of the French New Wave on New Hollywood’s use of innovative film elements in its representation of youth and violence.
Film genre and film style: Black comedy No. 3 (1997) The Big Lebowski (1998) To what extent do “black comedy” films differ according to cultural context?
Film theory: Soviet Montage Battleship Potemkin (1925) Koyaanisqatsi (1982) To what extent are specific features of Soviet montage theory faithfully employed in a contemporary experimental film?

External Assessment Criteria SL and HL

Peer Review Checklist

 

TASK COMPONENTS (ACTION) Notes / Suggestions
__ Assemble Findings
__ Develop a personal and critically reflective perspective
__ Identify and gather appropriate audio-visual material to support the study
SCREENPLAY
__ Justify the chosen topic and selected films
__ Make sure that the text is in a formal academic register (can be in the 1st person)
__ The balance between visual and spoken elements
__ Make clear reference to your sources as on-screen citations (text on-screen)
__ Make sure the primary weight of evidence for the study from the two chosen films
__ Make sure each film is given equal consideration
__ Make sure film language information is communicated clearly throughout (avoid “to be” verbs – make statements like “blah is this.”)
__ Make sure information is communicated logically rooted in film language
__ Have another student highlight the WHAT WHY HOW in your draft screenplay
VIDEO ESSAY
__ Recorded voice and edited commentary numerous times until happy with the material
__ Make sure your name and the school’s name ARE NOT IN THE ESSAY
__ Make sure to have 10-second title card with:

1. Area of film focus

2. Titles of the two films for comparison

3. The chosen topic

__ Include breaks in your recorded commentary to enable other audio-visual material included in the study to be clearly heard (if needed)
__ Make sure film clip length matches points being made
__ Make sure still images have citations on-screen if you have them
__ Make sure text on-screen is legible and spelled correctly
__ Make sure information is communicated audibly (levels are good for all sound)
__ Make sure information is communicated visually appropriate manner
__ Make sure background music is from Creative Commons and is cited
__ Make sure edits are clean
__ Make sure the presentation is 10 minutes maximum, including title card and credits
__ Make sure two films are listed in sources

School of Rock – Week 11 – Updating Workflow – Mind Like Water

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

“‘Be shapeless and formless.. like water’ (Bruce Lee)” by Akinini.com is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

“Have a mind like water.”

― David Allen,  GTD

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

PRACTICE ROOM (GUITAR LESSONS)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 30 minutes in the ‘room’
  • Write a reflection of the key topics that got your attention.
  • Write how far did you got in lessons this week
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE
Screenshot from Mary Spender’s YouTube Channel

Watch Mary Spender: Powerful advice from 10 Professional Musicians you need to hear (14:15)

Screenshot from JustinGuitar.com
Screenshot from JustinGuitar.com
  • Screenshot from JustinGuitar.comBe curious about Justin.
  • Mr. Le Duc considers him the best beginning guitar teacher online. He’s not the only one that thinks this.  Check out some of the celebrity endorsements at justinguitar.com.

How interested in learning more about playing the guitar?

    • 1 (YUCK!)
    • 2 (not really)
    • 3 (sorta interested)
    • 4 (interested)
    • 5 (YES!)

Your score: ?

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 15 minutes in the ‘room’
  • Pick a video essay from Holistic Songwriting’s Artist Series and watch it.
  • Write a reflection of the key topics that got your attention.
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

Holistic Songwriting by Friedemann Findeisen

Screenshot from Holistic Songwriting’s Channel at YouTube

An Example: The Swift Formula – One Note Melodies

From Holistic Songwriting’s How Taylor Swift Writes Melodies at YouTube
From Holistic Songwriting’s How Taylor Swift Writes Melodies at YouTube
From Holistic Songwriting’s How Taylor Swift Writes Melodies at YouTube

How interested in learning more about music theory and song analysis?

    • 1 (YUCK!)
    • 2 (not really)
    • 3 (sorta interested)
    • 4 (interested)
    • 5 (YES!)

Your score: ?

LAB (THEORY PRACTICED)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 15 minutes in this ‘room’
  • Write a reflection of the key topics that got your attention.
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE
Screenshot of Lyrics Melody and Chord Progressions from HookTab at YouTube

Explore the tutorials (but you do not need to watch all of them – just pick what looks interesting to you) from the:

How interested in learning more about HookLab and HookTab?

    • 1 (YUCK!)
    • 2 (not really)
    • 3 (sorta interested)
    • 4 (interested)
    • 5 (YES!)

Your score: ?

OUTSIDE (PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 15 minutes in this ‘room’
Image from bananatreelog.com

  • Go for a 10-minute walk, if it is safe to do so 
    • Reflect on how you structure your day to maximize your production of the  D.O.S.E. happiness brain chemicals
  • Writing a small paragraph reflection for 10 minutes
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

How interested in learning more about music theory and song analysis?

    • 1 (YUCK!)
    • 2 (not really)
    • 3 (sorta interested)
    • 4 (interested)
    • 5 (YES!)

Your score: ?

STUDIO (SONGWRITING)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 15 minutes
  • Write a reflection of the key topics that got your attention.
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE
Screenshot from Holistic Songwriting at YouTube
Screenshot from Holistic Songwriting at YouTube

Watch Holistic Songwriting: Do THIS with every song you write | Hit Song Architect S1E3

How interested in songwriting, song structure, and music production?

    • 1 (YUCK!)
    • 2 (not really)
    • 3 (sorta interested)
    • 4 (interested)
    • 5 (YES!)

Your score: ?

CONTROL ROOM (RECORDING & MIXING)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 15 minutes in this ‘room’
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE
Soundtrap mixing and publishing at Clark Eagling’s YouTube Channel

Watch Clark Eagling: Soundtrap tutorial 5 – Arranging the song, Mixing and adding effects

Watch all five videos in the playlist, if you are interested.

How interested in recording, engineering (sound effects, EQ), and mixing?

    • 1 (YUCK!)
    • 2 (not really)
    • 3 (sorta interested)
    • 4 (interested)
    • 5 (YES!)

Your score: ?

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

Game Design – Week 11 – Updating Workflow – Mind Like Water

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

“‘Be shapeless and formless.. like water’ (Bruce Lee)” by Akinini.com is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

“Have a mind like water.”

― David Allen,  GTD

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

PRACTICE ROOM (TUTORIALS)

  • Set a timer for 30 minutes in this ‘room’
    • Continue with either ONE of the scripting languages below, Javascript (Construct 3 / PlayCanvas) or C# (Unity)  (NOT BOTH)

Construct 3 / PlayCanvas – Javascript

Unity – C#

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

Screenshot from Construct.net
  • Set a timer
  • Spend 15 minutes in this ‘room’
  • Read Why Use Construct?
  • Explore some games made with Construct 3 at The Showcase Page
  • Read this page: Contruct.net
    • Learn about the basics of Construct 3
  • Write a couple sentence description of what you learned
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

LAB (THEORY PRACTICED)

Screenshot from editor.construct.net
  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 15 minutes
  • Take the guided tour
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

OUTSIDE (PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 30 minutes in this ‘room’
Image from bananatreelog.com

  • Go for a 15-minute walk, if it is safe to do so 
    • Reflect on how you structure your day to maximize your production of the  D.O.S.E. happiness brain chemicals
  • Writing a small paragraph reflection for 10 minutes
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

STUDIO (CREATIVITY)

Screenshot from Construct Begginer’s Guide
  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 45 minutes
  • Make something to share on Thursday (3rd Period) or Friday (4th Period)
  • Write a couple sentence description of what you made
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

CONTROL ROOM (PRODUCTION)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 15 minutes in this ‘room’
  • Publish your work from Construct.net to our Schoology Construct 3 Discussion Board
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

Film – Week 11 – Updating Workflow – Mind Like Water

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

“‘Be shapeless and formless.. like water’ (Bruce Lee)” by Akinini.com is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

“Have a mind like water.”

― David Allen,  GTD

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

PRACTICE ROOM (TUTORIALS)

Screenshot from sneakonthelot.com
Screenshot from sneakonthelot.com
  • Set a timer for 60 minutes in this ‘room’

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

Screenshot from The Story of Film Trailer on NetworkReleasing YouTube channel
  • Set a timer
  • Spend 75 minutes in this ‘room’
  • Watch the first episode of The Story of Film and take notes in a separate blog post

Steps

  1. Create a blog post titled, Story of Film – Episode 1 – Birth of the Cinema
  2. Embed an interesting Creative Commons image from Flickr.com at the top of your post
  3. Create a heading 2 titled Notes 
  4. Watch Mr. Le Duc’s Story of Film Notetaking Video Tutorial (2:00)
  5. Copy and paste the episode’s referenced films as text with links from The Story of Film: An Odyssey at Wikipedia
  6. Cite your source as Wikipedia and link back to The Story of Film: An Odyssey page
    • Example: “The following material is from Wikipedia.”
  7. Take notes as you watch the episode
    • Indent under the film Mark Cousins is referencing
      • Place your notes there
      • These notes will help you on future research projects in high school and possibly in college
  8. Access Episode 1 and begin watching

Examples

  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

OUTSIDE (PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 15 minutes in this ‘room’
Image from bananatreelog.com

  • Go for a 10-minute walk, if it is safe to do so 
    • Reflect on how you structure your day to maximize your production of the  D.O.S.E. happiness brain chemicals
  • Writing a small paragraph reflection for 10 minutes
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

School of Rock – Week 10 – GTD – Getting Things Done – Part 2

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

Image from BiggerPlate.com

Teens are overwhelmed, partly because they don’t yet have the skills to manage the unprecedented amount of stuff that enters their brains each day.  – from LifeHacker.com

“Your mind is for having ideas, not holding them.”

“You can do anything, but not everything.”

― David Allen, (GTD) Getting Things Done for Teens: Take Control of Your Life in a Distracting World

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

PRACTICE ROOM (TUTORIALS)

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

Screenshot from Animated Book Summary And Review at YouTube

You are going to learn to develop your own version of David Allen’s Getting Things Done (GTD) process in this ‘room.’

LAB (THEORY PRACTICED)

Screenshot of David Allen TED Talk
Screenshot of David Allen TED Talk
Screenshot from Animated Book Summary And Review at YouTube

Examine Two GTD Maps: Basic and Detailed

  1. Detailed map by guccio@文房具社 icensed under CC BY-NC 2.0
  2. Basic map from BiggerPlate.com embedded below

GTD-based Trusted System

Image from Trello.com
  • Examine and pick a trusted system from the 4 options listed below to ‘capture’ your work
    • trusted system is your method for managing your tasks in a way that you consistently get things done
    1. Trello.com with a – GTD Template
      • We use Trello in this class to manage group projects
        • You will create a Trello account a few weeks from now regardless
        • You might want to start now
      • We start using Trello in the second semester
      • Watch Mr. Le Duc Creating a Trello Account and Add GTD Template Tutorial (3:45)
      • You can get the free Trello app at the Apple Store or Google Play
    2. Your phone
    3. Paper and pen or pencil
    4. Examine LifeHacker.com’s GTD Resources

OUTSIDE (PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

  • Go for a 15-minute walk, if it is safe to do so  and follow the advice from David Allen
    • Bring a notepad
    • Walk and relax and allow your mind to wander
    • If you land on something that needs your attention, write it down
    • Continue throughout your walk
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

OPTIONAL EXERCISE

Image from GoodReads.com
Image from GoodReads.com

STUDIO (CREATING MAPS)

Image from zenkit.com
  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 15 minutes
  • Then watch David Allen summarize the steps
    • “Very simple folks! …
      1. Just WRITE STUFF DOWN
      2. Decide the ACTIONS and OUTCOMES embedded in them
      3. Get yourself a MAP OF ALL THAT so you can step back and take a look at it.
      4. And then, basically, you USE THE MAP TO DECIDE, “OK, here’s the course that we’re going to go on.”
      5. You then LAUNCH the ‘ship’ on a trusted course in the short term, as well as on the long horizon that you’re moving on.
      6. And then, on a regular basis, you need to REASSESS, “OK, we need to take in NEW DATA, CLEANUP, RECALIBRATE, and REFOCUS for the next leg of the journey.”
    • It’s that simple…”
  • ‘Capture’ all the ACTION ITEMS you can in your GTD Trusted System

CONTROL ROOM (PRODUCTION)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 10 minutes in this ‘room’
  • Share your system with the class in the Schoology Week 10 Discussion Board
    • Take a picture or screenshot and post on our Schoology page
  • Prepare to briefly share how your system helps you…
    1. Capture Action Items
    2. Process them
    3. and Organize them
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

Film – Week 10 – GTD – Getting Things Done – Part 2

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

Image from BiggerPlate.com

Teens are overwhelmed, partly because they don’t yet have the skills to manage the unprecedented amount of stuff that enters their brains each day.  – from LifeHacker.com

“Your mind is for having ideas, not holding them.”

“You can do anything, but not everything.”

― David Allen, (GTD) Getting Things Done for Teens: Take Control of Your Life in a Distracting World

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

PRACTICE ROOM (TUTORIALS)

Screenshot from Sneakonthelot.com
Screenshot from Sneakonthelot.com

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

Screenshot from Animated Book Summary And Review at YouTube

You are going to learn to develop your own version of David Allen’s Getting Things Done (GTD) process in this ‘room.’

LAB (THEORY PRACTICED)

Screenshot of David Allen TED Talk
Screenshot of David Allen TED Talk
Screenshot from Animated Book Summary And Review at YouTube

Examine Two GTD Maps: Basic and Detailed

  1. Detailed map by guccio@文房具社 icensed under CC BY-NC 2.0
  2. Basic map from BiggerPlate.com embedded below

GTD-based Trusted System

Image from Trello.com
  • Examine and pick a trusted system from the 4 options listed below to ‘capture’ your work
    • trusted system is your method for managing your tasks in a way that you consistently get things done
    1. Trello.com with a – GTD Template
      • We use Trello in this class to manage group projects
        • You will create a Trello account a few weeks from now regardless
        • You might want to start now
      • We start using Trello in the second semester
      • Watch Mr. Le Duc Creating a Trello Account and Add GTD Template Tutorial (3:45)
      • You can get the free Trello app at the Apple Store or Google Play
    2. Your phone
    3. Paper and pen or pencil
    4. Examine LifeHacker.com’s GTD Resources

OUTSIDE (PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

  • Go for a 15-minute walk, if it is safe to do so  and follow the advice from David Allen
    • Bring a notepad
    • Walk and relax and allow your mind to wander
    • If you land on something that needs your attention, write it down
    • Continue throughout your walk
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

OPTIONAL EXERCISE

Image from GoodReads.com
Image from GoodReads.com

STUDIO (CREATING MAPS)

Image from zenkit.com
  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 15 minutes
  • Then watch David Allen summarize the steps
    • “Very simple folks! …
      1. Just WRITE STUFF DOWN
      2. Decide the ACTIONS and OUTCOMES embedded in them
      3. Get yourself a MAP OF ALL THAT so you can step back and take a look at it.
      4. And then, basically, you USE THE MAP TO DECIDE, “OK, here’s the course that we’re going to go on.”
      5. You then LAUNCH the ‘ship’ on a trusted course in the short term, as well as on the long horizon that you’re moving on.
      6. And then, on a regular basis, you need to REASSESS, “OK, we need to take in NEW DATA, CLEANUP, RECALIBRATE, and REFOCUS for the next leg of the journey.”
    • It’s that simple…”
  • ‘Capture’ all the ACTION ITEMS you can in your GTD Trusted System

CONTROL ROOM (PRODUCTION)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 10 minutes in this ‘room’
  • Share your system with the class in the Schoology Week 10 Discussion Board
    • Take a picture or screenshot and post on our Schoology page
  • Prepare to briefly share how your system helps you…
    1. Capture Action Items
    2. Process them
    3. and Organize them
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

Game Design – Week 10 – GTD – Getting Things Done – Part 2

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

Image from BiggerPlate.com

Teens are overwhelmed, partly because they don’t yet have the skills to manage the unprecedented amount of stuff that enters their brains each day.  – from LifeHacker.com

“Your mind is for having ideas, not holding them.”

“You can do anything, but not everything.”

― David Allen, (GTD) Getting Things Done for Teens: Take Control of Your Life in a Distracting World

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

PRACTICE ROOM (TUTORIALS)

  • Set a timer
    • Spend up to 15 minutes in this ‘room’ on either ONE of the scripting languages below, Javascript (PlayCanvas) or C# (Unity)  (NOT BOTH)

PlayCanvas – Javascript

Unity – C#

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

Screenshot from Animated Book Summary And Review at YouTube

You are going to learn to develop your own version of David Allen’s Getting Things Done (GTD) process in this ‘room.’

LAB (THEORY PRACTICED)

Screenshot of David Allen TED Talk
Screenshot of David Allen TED Talk
Screenshot from Animated Book Summary And Review at YouTube

Examine Two GTD Maps: Basic and Detailed

  1. Detailed map by guccio@文房具社 icensed under CC BY-NC 2.0
  2. Basic map from BiggerPlate.com embedded below

GTD-based Trusted System

Image from Trello.com
  • Examine and pick a trusted system from the 4 options listed below to ‘capture’ your work
    • trusted system is your method for managing your tasks in a way that you consistently get things done
    1. Trello.com with a – GTD Template
      • We use Trello in this class to manage group projects
        • You will create a Trello account a few weeks from now regardless
        • You might want to start now
      • We start using Trello in the second semester
      • Watch Mr. Le Duc Creating a Trello Account and Add GTD Template Tutorial (3:45)
      • You can get the free Trello app at the Apple Store or Google Play
    2. Your phone
    3. Paper and pen or pencil
    4. Examine LifeHacker.com’s GTD Resources

OUTSIDE (PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

  • Go for a 15-minute walk, if it is safe to do so  and follow the advice from David Allen
    • Bring a notepad
    • Walk and relax and allow your mind to wander
    • If you land on something that needs your attention, write it down
    • Continue throughout your walk
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

OPTIONAL EXERCISE

Image from GoodReads.com
Image from GoodReads.com

STUDIO (CREATING MAPS)

Image from zenkit.com
  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 15 minutes
  • Then watch David Allen summarize the steps
    • “Very simple folks! …
      1. Just WRITE STUFF DOWN
      2. Decide the ACTIONS and OUTCOMES embedded in them
      3. Get yourself a MAP OF ALL THAT so you can step back and take a look at it.
      4. And then, basically, you USE THE MAP TO DECIDE, “OK, here’s the course that we’re going to go on.”
      5. You then LAUNCH the ‘ship’ on a trusted course in the short term, as well as on the long horizon that you’re moving on.
      6. And then, on a regular basis, you need to REASSESS, “OK, we need to take in NEW DATA, CLEANUP, RECALIBRATE, and REFOCUS for the next leg of the journey.”
    • It’s that simple…”
  • ‘Capture’ all the ACTION ITEMS you can in your GTD Trusted System

CONTROL ROOM (PRODUCTION)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend 10 minutes in this ‘room’
  • Share your system with the class in the Schoology Week 10 Discussion Board
    • Take a picture or screenshot and post on our Schoology page
  • Prepare to briefly share how your system helps you…
    1. Capture Action Items
    2. Process them
    3. and Organize them
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

Week 9 – GTD – Getting Things Done – Part 1

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

“Day 092/366 – To Do List” by Great Beyond is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Your toughest work is defining what your work is! –  Peter Drucker

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences of WHAT YOU DID
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

Image of David Allen at TED Talk
Screenshot from David Allen TED Talk

PRACTICE ROOM (TUTORIALS)

In this ‘room’ you are going to try Getting Things Done (GTD).

STEP 1: MAKE A LIST

Screenshot of David Allen TED Talk
Screenshot of David Allen TED Talk
  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 5 minutes
  • Rewatch from 17:21-18:08 of the video
  • Write a list, here in this section of your blog,
    • All the things you need to complete for school
    • All classes, all assignments
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

STEP 2: NOTICE WHAT YOU NOTICED

Screenshot of David Allen TED Talk
Screenshot of David Allen TED Talk
  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 5 minutes
  • Rewatch from 18:08-19:55 of the video
  • Prioritize your list, here in this section of your blog
    • Most important at the top
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

STEP 3: SET A TIMER

https://giphy.com/gifs/time-clock-konczakowski-d3yxg15kJppJilnW
  1. Set a timer for your first task
    1. Decide how long you think it will take before you start
  2. Start working
  3. Repeat this process for 45 minutes for as many tasks as you can complete, then take a 15-minute break
    • Get up and get a drink of water
    • Get up and go for a walk
    • Every 20 minute blink your eyes 20 times while looking at least 20 feet away
      • This is good for your eyes

Start steps 1 through 3 again, repeat for your school day

OUTSIDE (PRODUCTIVITY & THE BRAIN)

David Allen image
Oct. 2020 Lucidchart interview with David Allen
Image from FastCompany Magazine, https://www.fastcompany.com/3026827/the-brain-hacks-top-founders-use-to-get-the-job-done
Image from FastCompany Magazine, https://www.fastcompany.com/3026827/the-brain-hacks-top-founders-use-to-get-the-job-done
  • Reflect on GTD and getting to the top of the colorful list above for a minute
    • How can the GTD process help you tame the crazy-busy dragon of modern life?

  • Then, go for a 15-minute walk, if it is safe to do so
  • Write a few sentences as a reflection
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

OPTIONAL EXERCISE – Read the article and go for another walk 🙂

 Katia Verresen homepage
Katia Verresen, kvaleadership.com

“I coach C-suite executives and rising stars from the earliest startups to Fortune 100 companies. My passion is to help ambitious leaders achieve their full human potential.”  – Read more about Katia…

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Write only a few sentences of WHAT YOU LEARNED
  • In one or two sentences, describe a PROBLEM YOU SOLVED
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

  • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
  • DELETE THIS WHOLE SECTION, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

Game Design – Week 8 – Logic, Flowcharts, and Coding

COPY AND PASTE ALL THE CONTENT BELOW

“Binary code” by Christiaan Colen is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

When asked the most important thing I should teach my students, the MIT student I was interviewing simply stated , ‘ teach them logic.’ – Mr. Le Duc

SUMMARY

  • Write your weekly summary here, last, at the end of the week…
    • Only one to two sentences
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

PRACTICE ROOM (TUTORIALS)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 15 minutes in this ‘room’ on either ONE of the scripting languages below, Javascript or C#  (NOT BOTH)

PlayCanvas

Screenshot from Sololearn.com

Unity

Screenshot from Sololearn.com

CLASSROOM (THEORY & ANALYSIS)

Image from https://monkeyblogmonkeydo.com/2010/07/19/so-duh-pop-quiz-classic-video-game-flowchart-edition/

Mr. Le Duc’s Flowchart Shape Guide

More Flowchart Creation Resources

LAB (THEORY PRACTICED)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 15 minutes in this ‘room’
  • Watch Mr. Le Duc’s How to Save Your Draw.io File to Your Google Drive Tutorial
  • Try to create your own game flow for one of your game ideas
  • Use Draw.io and save in your Google Drive
    • We will share these in class, soon
  • Link your Draw.io file from your Google Drive
  • Write a few sentences reflection about what you learned
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

OUTSIDE (CREATIVITY & THE BRAIN)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 35 minutes,
    • 20 minutes watching Elizabeth Gilbert
    • 15 minutes walking

  • Watch Elizabeth Gilbert discuss creativity and genius
  • Go for a walk outside and think about what she said, if you can safely
  • Write anything you found interesting and useful in your reflection
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

STUDIO (GAME DESIGN)

  • Set a timer
  • Spend up to 60 minutes in this ‘room’ on either ONE of the game engines below, (NOT BOTH)

PlayCanvas

Screenshot from Daniel Wood’s YouTube Channel Playlist

Unity

Screenshot from Unity.com

WHAT I LEARNED and PROBLEMS I SOLVED

  • Tell your daily story here!  Highlight what you learned and enjoyed most and at least one problem you solved. Problem-solving is one of the most important skills you need in life. Employers want to know HOW you get stuff done as much as WHAT you got done.
  • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE

WEEKLY ACTIVITY EVALUATION

    • Spend 3 minutes on this activity
    • Give feedback on this week’s class Content and Process
    • The data you submit helps you demonstrate 21st Century Employability Skills
    • DELETE ALL OF MR. LE DUC’s INSTRUCTIONS, AFTER YOU ARE DONE